Influenza Vaccine

Vaccine Efficacy: 

1. According to the CDC, over the last 16 years, the influenza vaccine is 39.9% effective.

2. A 2020 observational study in the Annuals of Internal Medicine looking at 170 million episodes of influenza in vaccinated adults over the age of 65 found “no evidence indicated that vaccination reduced hospitalizations or mortality among elderly persons.”

3. Another large review of twenty five reports of studies involving 59,566 people done by the Cochrane Library concluded that “influenza vaccines are effective in reducing serologically confirmed cases of influenza. However, they are not as effective in reducing cases of clinical influenza and number of working days lost. Universal immunization of healthy adults is not supported by the results of this review.”

Vaccine Safety & Adverse Events

1. National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP)

The Health Resources and Services Commission shows that out of all petitions submitted to the VICP, 55% were from the influenza vaccine.  Influence vaccination accounted for 69% of all compensable petitions (the injured petitioner was paid money by the VICP).   

2. Adverse effects of vaccines: Evidence and causality- 2012 Institute for Medicine Report

The Institute of Medicine (IOM) was charged by Congress when it enacted the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act in 1986 with reviewing the literature regarding the adverse events associated with vaccines covered by the program. Their most recent (2012) conclusions regarding the influenza vaccine are summarized below:

1. The evidence convincingly supports a causal relationship between influenza vaccine and anaphylaxis.
2. The evidence favors acceptance of a causal relationship between Oculorespiratory syndrom and two particular vaccines used in 3 particular years in Canada.
3. The evidence favors rejection of a causal relationship between inactivated influenza vaccine and Bell’s palsy and asthma exacerbation or reactive airway disease episodes in children and adults.
4. The evidence* is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between influenza vaccine and:
encephalitis, encephalopathy, seizure, optic neuritis, transverse myelitis, small fiber neuropathy, neuromyelitis optica, vasculitis, polyarthritis. nodosa, fibromyalgia, stroke, myocardial infarction, onset or relapse of multiple sclerosis in adults, onset or exacerbation of arthropathy, Guillain-Barre syndrome, brachial neuritis, acute disseminated, encephalomyelitis, all-cause mortality, onset or exacerbation of systemic, lupus erythematosus, chronic inflammatory disseminated, polyneuropathy, asthma exacerbation or reactive airway disease episodes in children younger than 5 years of age
*”The vast majority of causality conclusions in the report are that the evidence was inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship. Some might interpret that to mean either of the following statements: Because the committee did not find convincing evidence that the vaccine does cause the adverse event, the vaccine is safe. Because the committee did not find convincing evidence that the vaccine does not cause the adverse event, the vaccine is unsafe. Neither of these interpretations is correct. “Inadequate to accept or reject” means just that—inadequate.”

Take Action:

1. Sign up for NJ Vaccine Science action alerts via email.

 

2. Stay Informed – check our our Blog and Advocacy Home page for action items, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

 

3. Call and Email your Senator and Assemblymembers – ask them to oppose bill S902/A969. Use this link to find your representatives’ phone number and send them a message.

 

4. Call and Email the Bill Sponsors: Senate President Sweeney: sensweeney@njleg.org / 856-251-9801; Assemblyman Conway  asmconway@njleg.org / (856) 461-3997

 

If you live in Legislative District 11 sign our D11 Petition to protect NJ’s RE. 

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